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20110710
20110710
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
. don, so if a tsunami was generated here, we will know rather shortly how bad, how big and whether it has arrived on the coast in just a few minutes here. and we'll keep you posted. >> we all remember what happened back on march 11th, it was the earthquake and then the tsunami that damaged so much of japan and the nuclear power plant. it was evacuated for a time earlier. we're hearing now the workers had been let back in. do you have information on that? >> that's the thing. we've had these 7.0s where we have the big scare. a lot of folks not knowing when you feel the earthquake, you really aren't sure if it's a 7.0, is it an 8.0? the folks in and around the plant will take the precautions and evacuate. if we're getting word they're letting them back in, i think we are looking pretty good here along the coast. >> ivan, stay on top of that for us. as he was speaking, we did see video coming from nhk there in japan. we want to go now to dale grant with the usgs. he joins us now from golden, california tonight. listen, sir, as we look at this video and you see the shaking there and yo
ivan cabrera saying that this is an aftershock from the march 11th quake. this is a big hit even though. >> yes. this actually is one -- well, it is the largest aftershock since the 9.0, and there were a few 7.0s at that time, but since that time, this is the biggest quake that has occurred in the aftershock zone. it has been felt all of the way north in aomori to south of tokyo and it is widely felt. >> so, listen, you are in golden, colorado, tonight, and as we watch the possibility of a tsunami, there was a warning there, and we saw what happened when on march 11th, when there was an earthquake and all of the sudden, this wall of water slams into the coast of japan and took out so much, so many cities there. when might we know if or the possibility of something happening from this not that severe, but when might we know something? >> actually, since tsunamis travel at 450 miles an hour, if one would have occurred, it would have already been known by now. >> okay. so, as we look at this though, and all of the buildings there that are really still damaged and all of the infrastructure,
'm don lemon. we'll start with breaking news tonight. we're starting with two big news stories. the first one, a roadblock tonight in negotiations over the nation's debt. the president and the house speaker both making statements in just the past hour. we're going to tell you what they said. also an earthquake, a powerful one has hit japan. a tsunami warning has been issued and that's where we're going to start right now. the japanese coast that has just hit the hardest by the earthquake earlier this year is under a tsunami warning at this hour. it is a magnitude 67 quake. it struck off the coast just about an hour ago felt as far as away as tokyo. we're going to join to our meet yolgs vimpb ca brar. is this an aftershock? >> absolutely. it's a 7.0. this is an automatic thing that they do here in japan. when you get a 7.0, approximately 100 miles east of the coast, it was strong enough or it could trigger an earthquake in the united states. we think of it assay you have a tornado warning as a result of a doppler indicated cell. we don't know if the tornado is on the ground. same thing her
been a big hit in london "evita" here had bad reviews. the mood changed. funny enough, i think that's an intriguing one because in the late '70s america was a little bit in denial about talking about anything political. i mean, you remember the time, after vietnam, and i remember writing the early days of the "evita" run we hit the -- at the same time of the russian invasion of afghanistan, which i don't think anybody really completely understood what was going on. for give me for talking about afghanistan. i've gone off on a tangent. >> another time. >> suddenly people started talking about politics again. they said, maybe paralleled with what we were trying to say there was an interesting subject. >> how much have the critics gotten to you over the years? >> i don't really care very much if i don't think the critics really understand music. >> somebody that you respect, what is the most hurtful kind of thing they could say that would really get to you? >> i guess somebody who i did respect as a musician said that the score was humdrum or something, then i would be sad if i believe
boehner balks as a big deal, but tonight's white house meeting is still on. today, the debt deal in peril with republican whip kevin mccarthy and democratic leader chris van hollen. then the economy in 2012 with rick santorum. >> we have a president who's in denial. >> and after the space shuttle with nasa administrator charles bolden. i'm candy crowley, and this is "state of the union." hope for a grand debt deal got buried last night in a blizzard of status quo rhetoric. speaker boehner writing -- out of the white house, communications director dan pfeiffer responded -- joining me now to try to make sense of where things stand, house republican whip, kevin mccarthy of california. if i am out there listening to all of this, i want to strangle all of you. why can you not get this deal? this looks to me like a strategic bargaining ploy rather than where we're actually going to end up from speaker boehner. >> i don't see that at all. boehn boehner's been very clear there are no votes for a tax increase. you look at the jobs data, only 18,000 jobs. canada has fewer people that live in califo
. >> thank you. >>> speaking boehner balks as a big deal, but tonight's white house meeting is still on. today, the debt deal in pairil. and then the economy in 2012 with presidential candidate, rick santorum. >>> i am candy crowley, and this is "state of the union." hoped for a grand debt deal got buried last night in a blizzard of status quo rhetoric. the white house will not pursue a bigger debt reduction agreement without tax hikes. i think the best approach may be in producing a smaller measure. and dan pfeiffer responded, we cannot ask the middle class and seniors to bear all the costs and budget cuts. >>> joining me now, house republican whip, kevin mccarthy of california. if i am out there listening to all of this, i want to stan gul awful you. why can you not get this deal? it looks like a bargaining ploy? >> i don't think so. you would not increase taxes on the small business, which is what the president wants to do. you had an negotiation with cantor and kyl and biden. so what he's saying, let's go there, there's no taxes, and there are cuts right there, but why don't you als
a big, cold bucket of water. another one said that this is like we're waiting for job growth to take off and instead we are sitting grounded in the terminal month after month waiting for our flight. what's your reaction to this disappointing jobs report? >> the terminal one is a depressing thought. it's an awful jobs report. it's just awful. i was certainly expecting at least to get enough jobs to sort of keep us moving a little bit. unfortunately this is what happens after a deep financial crisis. this is par for the course. the average after a deep financial crisis postwars, four years or more of bad job numbers before things really start getting better. we thought we could beat things with our stimulus, aggressive monetary policy. but it looks like we won't. >> a lot of my colleagues have been asking me, why are the estimates so wildly off? i keep saying, we've come from such a dramatic move in the economy that people really are trying to get -- experts are trying to get a handle on where we go from here. am i right? >> absolutely. if you look at past financial crises and not past rec
for wealthier americans. that's the reason john boehner says the talks have broken down on the big deal. the white house pushing back saying that boehner had initially agreed to tax increases as part of a deal. where does it go from here? the white house saying that the president still at that meeting today will be pushing for that big deal because they don't believe this is the time to back down. but no doubt, the latest developments will put a great amount of pressure on these talks this evening. >> there has been some compromise. why though might that not be enough to kind of put things back on track? >> reporter: that's right. the compromise you're talking about there, at one point the democrats and president in particular had said that social security and medicare would not be part of this overall deal but in recent weeks the president has been warming up to the idea and putting social security and medicare on the table. but there's been a lot of pressure from the left from liberal democrats who don't believe that some of the hardest working americans should be paying the price whi
need to do something very big, very substantial to bring our long term deficits down over time. we have to do that in a way that's good for the economy so we give more support to the economy still healing from the great recession. and it's going to require both sides to compromise. >> cnn dan lothian is at the white house right now. dan, bipartisan talks fell apart yesterday. what was the breaking point. >> the breaking point really was republicans, in particular house republicans, speaker john boehner saying democrats and the president continued pushing for tax increases as part of any deal. as you know, this white house, the president, has been talking about wealthier americans needing to bear some of the burden here and looking at how you can shave back some of the breaks and loopholes that wealthy americans receive. so boehner walking away from the discussions now looking at perhaps some sort of a smaller deal. but the white house saying that the president still wants to move forward with this ambitious plan of cutting the deficit by up to $4 trillion, saying that as you heard secre
,000 and up to one year in jail. >> 4,000 bucks, right. >> oh, my gosh. everything's big in texas. >> and a year in jail. unbelievable. >> you can catch our legal guys every saturday noon eastern right here in the "cnn newsroom." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> the u.s. is withholding $800 million in aid to pakistan. president obama's chief of staff confirmed the move today. william daley says pakistan has, quote, taken some steps that have given us reason to pause, end quote. the pakistani military tells cnn it has not been officially informed that aid from washington is being withheld. >>> with the final edition of britain's popular tabloid "news of the world" on stands, rupert murdoch is hoping to limit the damage to his media empire. murdoch arrived in london today. his company's british subsidiary closed "news of the world" after reports the newspaper hacked the phone of a missing teenager who was later found dead. >>> in india 13 cars in a packed train jumped the tracks today. rescue officials confirm 28 deaths already and say that number will likely rise as they s
to the men and women watching us on the armed forces network. a big thank you to you as well. >>> we're just hours before tonight's debt reduction talks at the white house. live pictures there this morning. the ambitious hopes for a large-scale deal have been dashed. the apparent sticking point? taxes, here is how house speaker, john boehner, sees it as democrat and republican leader prepare for tonight's showdown. quote, despite good-faith efforts to find common ground, the white house will not pursue debt reductions without tax hikes. i believe the best approach may be to focus on producing smaller cuts, that still meets our call for spending reforms and cuts greater than the amount of the debt limit increase. the white house talking about expectations at those talks. here's what spokesman dan fiver had to say about it. he said we cannot ask the middle class and seniors to bear all the burden of higher costs and budget cuts. we need a balanced approach, he says that asks the very wealthiest and special interests to pay their fair share as well and we believe the american people agree. cnn
. jeter getting his 3,000th hit yesterday. >> that was a big day for him and the yankees as a whole. yankees shortstop, derek jeter, reached the historic milestone on saturday. and ray d'alessio is joining me. it's a huge day for derek jeter. >> yankee's fans, they love this guy. what does he do? he goes out and gets his 3,000th hit. he hit it by hitting a home run. one of the nicest guys that as a member of the media that you can interview. and even bigger than him getting his 3,000th hit, and you are from jersey, and you now how rich the yankees players are. joe dimaggio, and none of them never reached the 3,000 hits, and derek jeter the first to do so. you have the young fan, and the fan who catches the ball -- >> he didn't have to give it back, did he? >> no, he could have sold this ball, and there was talk this ball could have gone for thousands. a life-long yankee fan. what does he say? jeter worked his rear end off. he got to meet jeter, and the yankees went ahead and gave him tickets to the championship suite for the remainder of the season, and he made out. >> ice cream, ho
security, were they to get that big, grand bargain. even if they don't, there may be changes to entitlement programs. on the other side, democrats wanted to see tax increases and a small set of people with very little infrut the larger set of member of congress making a deal behind closed doors and there won't be a lot of time for the public to assess that before members of congress are asked to vote on it and that might have the affect on the ability of the house speaker and harry reid to actually pass a debt ceiling increase once some sort of agreement is made. >> i was reading this today in the "new york times," david. i'm going to give this to you. nearly three dozen house republicans and another dozen in the senate joined most of the republican presidential candidates in signing a pledge that will not, that they will not vote to support the debt limit increase unless congress approved a balanced budget amendment to the constitution which is unlike -- okay. most people agree, every economist, every economist of weight will say, by doing this they are possibly spooking the markets, and f
.s. is withholding $800 million in military aid to pakistan, a big sign that tensions are growing behind the two countries. our senior state department producer elise is covering this for us. elise, this is about one-third, one-third of the military aid the u.s. gives pakistan annually. why this move and why now? >> that's right, don. part pressure to get pakistan to do more. part retaliation because pakist pakistan threw out a lot of army trainers after the u.s. killed osama bin laden. it's because they threw out these trainers they can't have this aid because you really comes as a package deal. u.s. personnel on the ground. you have to play, if you want us to pay, don. >> so, elise, how serious is this riff between afghanistan and islam bad? >> it's gradually decreasing. a lot for fit for tat and what is going to happen next now that the u.s. reduced this aid. what are the pakistanis going to do? the u.s. is already very concerned that it can't trust the pakistani military and the pakistani intelligence with the information they're giving them about the milmilitants. so, a big concern right no
ahead, diane. >> here is my big problem. network executives, television executives have decided to give programs to -- and nancy grace is a friend of mine, i want to say up front, i worked with her at court tv, i co-hosted a baby shower, but let's remember, i'm are trained journalist. she's a lawyer. she's a former prosecutor. there are beauty queens, there are doctors, there are 23450edians, who all have national programs on that talked about this case on television who i would submit are not trained journalists and not really qualified to talk about a case like this, and that's where it gets mixed up. >> i don't think she's qualified, either. i don't know nancy grace, i didn't host her baby shower, i'm sure i would like her as a person, but i think she's wrong. >> i'm not arguing -- >> she influenced the outcome. in the case with the african-american woman. that was a public defender and three-day trial. do you think that jurors sitting in that jury box don't have for a month, wasn't it or three weeks, don't have some sort of relationship with the woman who's sitting in that jury? isn
a crime. it has been a rape or an attempt of rape. it is a big crime, and it will have to be punished. >> simon schama, in his column at "the daily beast," bernard henri-levy said this is like ropes spear. you wrote a book on the french revolution. do you think there's any -- >> i can understand bernard's passion about that, but as we know, the guillotine was the conclusion of that. that's not exactly what happened to dominique strauss-kahn. what i wanted to say to bernard and the discussion is that much of what he says i share, but i think it boils down to this kind of very lurid relationship between the tabloid press and the nature of criminal prosecution, spectacular. criminal prosecution or criminal apprehension, potential criminal apprehension, as a kind of public spectacle. >> like the casey anthony trial. >> yes. exactly. there is something in american public life, actually, which assumes it not to be problematic, actually, to make it a show before any guilt is necessarily proven. >> you have this tendency, also in france, and it was even more severe and as severe concerning fr
favorite big g cereals. from cheerios to lucky charms, there's whole grain in every box. make sure to look for the white check. >>> larry hall and his brother, gary, had always been a little different. look at you two little boys. which one are you and which one is larry? >> this would be me. >> gary and larry. >> yeah. >> in a rare recorded interview obtained by cnn, larry hall recounts a tough start. >> i know when i was born my mother told me that i was blue, that i hadn't got enough oxygen to me or something. >> identical twin sons growing up hard. in the hall home, there was little money and lots of problems. author hillel levin interviewed larry hall. >> it was a very cluttered household. they were raised with dysfunction. >> neighbors say their mother was domineering. their father drank and sometimes turned violent. he worked at the local cemetery. what was it like growing up next to a cemetery? was it creepy? >> no, not at all, not for me. you know, at 12 years of age, larry and i started working at the cemetery. >> as he grew older, larry had problems fitting in at school. >> he w
. but actually, it's never been easier to get the whole grain you want from your favorite big g cereals. from cheerios to lucky charms, there's whole grain in every box. make sure to look for the white check. so i wasn't playing much of a role in my own life, but with advair, i'm breathing better so now i can take the lead on a science adventure. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator, working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking advair. if you're still having difficulty breathing, take the lead. ask your doctor if including advair could help improve your lung function. get your first full prescription free and save
at big hospitals, but even on the battlefields, they have started taking medical commodities, these forward tents and moving them further forward for that same reason. there's been a lot of lessons more recently from iraq and afghanistan. you've been talking to people about that. what have you been hearing? >> what doctors are telling us, it's sad to think, but a basic fact. tens of thousands have been wounded in this war. you have this giant population of, that they are learning from. and what they're basically learning, they will tell you, i think is dynamic innovative, fast-moving medical care. try new things, try and see what you can accomplish with new techniques, new procedures. because they can't stick to just the old way of doing business. these kids are coming back with traumatic injuries that are very, very tough. they got to find a way to deal with them. and you find doctors and nurses out there trying new things, things that may be in your emergency room, not too far from now. >> i'm not quite sure how to say this, but i think on the battlefield you are forced to
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)